Monday, July 6

Tag: Roman Empire

THE INEVITABLE SELF-DESTRUCTION OF EMPIRES
Study of Societies

THE INEVITABLE SELF-DESTRUCTION OF EMPIRES

Strangely, it was the Roman citizens who breathed the biggest sigh of relief when the declining Roman Empire (27 BC – 1453 AD) finally collapsed. Perhaps this is true for most empires. The burden of an aging empire is painful for those unfortunates who have to endure it; they wish that it be gone quietly. When an empire is crumbling and they usually do so from within first, the ruling elite becomes more corrupt, demand more taxes from the poor and fresh blood for more wars. The famous historian Edward Gibbon in his book “History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire” has identified four main reasons that contributed to the collapse of the Roman Empire. 1. The empire became too big and costly 2. The Roman elite were plundering the wealth 3. Roman barbarians were attacking and exp...
THE EVOLUTION AND FATE OF THE SOCIAL ORDER
Study of Societies

THE EVOLUTION AND FATE OF THE SOCIAL ORDER

What is peculiar about the human mind is that it drives things forward, it demands constant and perpetual progress and what we might call a “progressive environment.” When considering human progress, we really do have few options. The only alternative to progress is to decay and perish. As for the “social order”, the laws of nature are harsh and unforgiving. What is obsolescent has to be discarded and replaced through a regeneration process. Darwin was surely right when he described “the survival of the fittest” and “the selection process” as nature’s two important laws. These two laws reflect the intense competition for the top position. Only the fittest can occupy the top position and all others are removed when weakness is exhibited. Challengers competing for the top position are seldo...